Seattle Fringe Festival Request for Proposals Now Open

Do you have a passion for creating space for new voices?

Requests for Proposals are now open for those interested in assuming a leadership role for the Seattle Fringe Festival.  Through this Request for Proposals process TPS is looking for an individual, group, or organization to take assume sole ownership. Those selected will have varied support from TPS in the first year of the festival in order to ensure a smooth transition. 

Proposals are due January 5th, 2019.

Questions should be directed to Laurie Lynch, Board Vice President, laurie@tpsonline.org.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE RFP

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Meet the Member Advisory Council

Tammi Doyle (she/her)

Tammi (she/her) is a theatre producer, director and playwright/lyricist. Director: Music Theatre Works (MTW- Founder) Northwest Asian American Thetares, Seattle Musical Theatre, Renton Civic Theatre, 5 Seattle Fringe Festivals (SFF), Asst. at the Seattle Rep, Youth Theatre NW, Piccoli Children’s Theatre,  Seattle PlayHouse for Young Performing Artists (Co-Founder.) San Francisco: Eureka Theatre Production Manager, Board Member of the Bay Area Theatre Workers Association. Produced works: Book and lyrics: White Porcelain Christmas, The Pied Piper, What She’s Having, Christina’s World  Plays: Snow Day, The Maltese Sparrow, Season Finale, Beyond the Break (co-writer). Tammi is a professor and chair of Theatre Arts at Bellevue College and is active with the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival. She holds a BA in History from UC Berkeley and an MFA in Theatre Direction from the University of Washington. She believes that TPS is and should continue to be a central communication and resource driven organization that aids its membership of individuals and organizations in becoming the most inclusive, expansive, vibrant and vital artists they can be. 


Andrea Kovich

Andrea (she/her) is a Seattle-based dramaturg, writer, and member of LMDA (Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of the Americas).  She self-identifies as a disabled artist and is passionate about collaborating with traditionally marginalized voices to promote diversity and inclusion. Local dramaturgy credits include: Frankenstein, Howl’s Moving Castle, and My Ántonia (Book-It Repertory Theatre), Persuasion and Baskerville (Taproot Theatre Company), The Rules of Charity and peeling (Sound Theatre Company).  Other projects include: curator for ILLUMINATE: Six Plays by Deaf and Disabled Playwrights with Sound Theatre, serving as a dramaturg in Umbrella Project’s 2018 Writers Group, and dramaturg for The Scratch 2019 workshop and staged readings of Tom Smith’s play, Anna’s Mother. As a member of the MAC, she’s excited to have the opportunity to make accessibility a priority within the organization and to strengthen connections between TPS and the theatre community.


Mark Light

Mark (he/him) is President of First Light Group, an organization with a mission to put your future within reach. He is a trusted leadership coach who empowers others to do good great, a master teacher known for contagious enthusiasm and actionable learning, and a street-smart writer. His leadership experience includes 15 blockbuster seasons transforming a small Ohio theatre into a top-30 performing arts center by making the customer the star. He was a decade-long Tony Awards voter and received the first-ever Award for Outstanding Achievement in Presenter Management from The Broadway League (whose members vote on the Tonys). Mark holds a BFA from Drake University, an MBA from UCLA, and a Ph.D. from Antioch University Graduate Program in Leadership and Change. Mark joined the TPS Member Advisory Council because I want to help TPS set the stage for the success of its members.


Sonja Lowe

Sonja (she/her) is a local Dramaturg. She has a BA in Theatre from Seattle Pacific University and a MLitt in Dramaturgy from the University of Glasgow. She is currently on staff at Taproot Theatre Company as the Grant Writer & Resident Dramaturg and has also contributed dramaturgical research to other Seattle theatre’s, including The Revolutionists (Theatre22), Slowgirl (SPT), A Lesson from Aloes (Thalia’s Umbrella) and Hedda Gabler (Harlequin Productions). Sonja has assisted in the development of several new script projects including stage adaptations of Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Jane Austen’s Persuasion, as well original scripts for the Seattle Play Series, the San Juan Island Community Theatre Playwright’s Festival and the Pork Filled Players’ UNLEASHED festival. For the past several years, Sonja has been honored to serve as a dramaturg mentor for students and interns at Taproot Theatre, Seattle Pacific University and Village Theatre’s Kidstage.


Mario Martinez

Mario (they/them) is a Detroit Michigan native and came to Seattle for their degree in Original Works from Cornish. As a #NoGoodDoer they have been navigating through the arts in Seattle, pushing for more QTPOC representation. Mario has worked with Freehold Theater, Cornish, Theater Schmeater, The Umbrella Project, the 14/48 Projects and have since then started their drag career as Lola Meraz performing at Studio Current, Kremwerk Complex, Annex Theater, Re-Bar, and Addo’s Cabaret among other queer spaces. See Mario next at On The Boards April 9-12th working with Markeith Wiley.  The queer community has so much to give, see us, hear us, hire us. Follow Mario on Instagram for more info @luigis_bro !


Jeremy Odden

Jeremy (he/him) is a freelance stagehand with Local 15, as well as a stage manager and designer on occasion. When not working in theatre, he is an educator in the Renton School District. He lives in Renton, and tries to see more theatre than he actually does, much to his regret. He hopes to see more this year!


Caroline Rensel

Caroline (she/her) is an actor, arts administrator, and occasional teaching artist. As an actor, she has worked with Seattle area companies including Annex Theatre, Dacha Theatre, the Edmonds Driftwood Players, and Shakespeare Northwest. Caroline is currently the Constituent Relations Officer at the University of Washington School of Drama. She was the Director of Development at TeenTix, an arts access and youth development non-profit, from 2016-2019. Prior to TeenTix, Caroline was the Arts Management Intern at Book-It Repertory Theatre, a Drama School Intern at Seattle Children’s Theatre, and spent a summer working as a Site Manager and Teaching Assistant for Seattle Shakespeare Company. Caroline is passionate about arts education and about building a more equitable arts community in Seattle. She holds a degree in Theatre from Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA.

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Valerie Curtis-Newton named the 2019 Gregory Falls Sustained Achievement Award recipient

Theatre Puget Sound (TPS) announces today that Valerie Curtis-Newton will be the recipient of the 2019 Gregory A. Falls Sustained Achievement Award.

Given each year in honor of Gregory A. Falls, this award acknowledges those individuals who have made an impact on our region’s theatre community and embody an inclusive and collaborative spirit.

Theatre Puget Sound’s Executive Director Ariel Bradler states, “Valerie’s artistic excellence and collaborative spirit are just a fraction of the impact she has had on our community. Her work with The Hansberry Project, hours of mentorship in and out of the classroom, and advocacy of POC artist voices will have a lasting effect on our regions theatrical landscape. It is an honor to celebrate this pillar of our community.”

Ms. Curtis-Newton will be the 22nd recipient of this prestigious honor. The 11th Annual Gregory Awards will occur on October 28th, 2019 at Marion Oliver McCaw Hall, hosted by Alexandria J. Henderson and Jimmy Shields.

About Valerie Curtis-Newton
Currently Head of Directing at the University of Washington’s School of Drama, Valerie is co-founder of the Hansberry Project – an African American Theatre Lab. The Hansberry Project celebrates, presents and supports the work of black theatre artists developing/producing new work; creating community outreach opportunities and providing an artistic home for black theatre professionals.

Valerie has previously served as an Artistic Associate at A Contemporary Theatre (ACT), the Artistic Director of Hartford Connecticut’s Performing Ensemble, Inc. (1987-1993) and the Artistic Director for Seattle’s Ethnic Cultural Theatre (1993-1998). Her national credits include work with the Guthrie Theater, the Seattle Repertory Theater, Mark Taper Forum, Actors’ Theatre of Louisville, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Seattle Children’s Theatre, Intiman Theatre, A Contemporary Theatre, New York Theatre Workshop, ArtsWest, West of Lenin, Seattle Public Theatre and Southern Repertory Theatre.

Valerie has been active in advancing the work of artists of color, serving on projects for
organizations such as the WA State Arts Commission, Seattle Arts Commission, the Playwrights Center of Minneapolis, The Theatre Communications Group, National Endowment for the Arts, National Black Theatre Festival and many others.

A recipient of both the National Endowment for the Arts/Theatre Communications Group
(TCG/NEA) Director Fellowship and the Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation’s (SDCF) Gielgud Directing Fellowship, Valerie holds a BA from Holy Cross College, an MFA in Directing from the University of Washington and is a member of the Society of Directors and Choreographers (SDC). Valerie has been awarded the Stranger Genius Awards in Performance, the Crosscut Courage Award for Culture and the ArtsFund Artist Innovation Award.

About the Gregory A. Falls Sustained Achievement Award
The Gregory Awards are named in honor of Gregory A. Falls, a former chair of the UW School of Drama, who is credited with creating Seattle’s vibrant theater scene. Falls died unexpectedly of pneumonia at age 75 on April 3, 1997. More than any other individual, Falls was “most responsible for the theater boom in this town,” said Arne Zaslove, former artistic director of the Bathhouse Theatre at Green Lake. “He was the impresario of bringing it all together.” Falls founded ACT Theatre, more than three decades ago, where he was ACT’s artistic director for 23 years until his retirement in 1987.

Previous recipients include: Kurt Beattie, Rex Carleton, Timothy McCuen Piggee, R. Hamilton Wright, Joyce Degenfelder, Kathy Hsieh, and Billy and Howie Seago.

TPS gratefully acknowledges Jean Burch Falls for her contributions and continued support in honoring those that shape our theatrical landscape.

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Melissa Hines Award Nominations Open

Do you know an individual who makes theatre possible but who often are not themselves recognized?

The deadline for nominations has been extended to
September 22, 2019.

Nominate that unsung hero who made an impact on our community.
__________________________________

Individuals recognized in this category are determined via committee, not popular vote – your submissions inform the committee’s starting point. Committee members are selected from the Member Advisory Council and TPS staff and board. The recipient will be honored at The Gregory Awards ceremony on October 28th, 2019.

Nominate Today!

The Melissa Hines Backstage Award is given each year to an individual – educator, administrator, crew member, stage manager, volunteer, etc. – who has worked tirelessly “behind the scenes” in support of our regional theatre community. This honor is named after Melissa Hines, in memoriam, who was the stalwart managing director of the Empty Space Theatre, a board member of various arts institutions, and served in the Seattle Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs.

Past Recipients Include:

2018 – Ruth Eitemiller (pictured above)
2017 – Louise Butler
2016 – Kyna Shilling
2015 – Emily Leong
2014 – Doug Staley & Roger Huston
2013 – Laura Campbell
2012 – John Bradshw

(photo by Tim Aguero)

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2019 Gregory Award Tickets are now on sale!

What’s new for 2019?

Tickets for the 2019 Gregory Awards are now on sale and this year we have a new, tiered ticket options with hopes that many more can join us for the festivities. Tickets are now available for as little as $15, see below for more details.

Consider joining us and the 2019 nominees for the VIP reception prior to the ceremony. TPS members – look out for your discount code to this special event. Tickets for this event are limited, get yours today!

Ticket prices increase on the day of the event when purchased at the door.

Purchase Tickets Today!

CHECK OUT OUR TIERED PRICING:

  • The $65 Producer Level reflects the full per-person cost of producing the Gregory Awards. This community event is not possible without the generous support of our sponsors and individual community members like you.
  • The $35 Collaborator Level helps TPS off-set a good portion of the cost of producing the Gregory Awards. Consider purchasing your ticket at the same level as last year and help us reach our revenue goals.
  • The $15 Supporter Level is a great way to participate in supporting the Gregory Awards on a tight budget. The Gregory Awards is first and foremost, a celebration of community. We hope more of our community can join us with this new ticket level.
  • VIP Tickets – join us at 6:00 and mix and mingle with the 2019 nominees in celebration of their excellence. At $100 non-members and $75 for members, ticket buyers enjoy complimentary food & drink and priority seating for the ceremony. Details of the event coming soon. (Members: email tps@tpsonline.org for your discount code)

NOTE:
TEENTIX WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR FOR $5 PER MEMBER
ALL OTHER TICKETS PURCHASED AT THE DOOR DAY-OF, INCREASE TO $50.

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Performers Alexandria J. Henderson and Jimmy Shields to Host the 11th Annual Gregory Awards

The Gregory Awards to be Presented Live from Marion Oliver McCaw Hall at the Seattle Center on Monday, October 28th


Seattle, WA (June 6, 2019)
 – Theatre Puget Sound (TPS) and The Gregory Awards announce today that performers Alexandria J. Henderson and Jimmy Shields will host the 11th Annual Gregory Awards, live at Marion Oliver McCaw Hall at the Seattle Center on Monday, October 28 (7:30pm).
This will be both Henderson and Shields’ first time hosting the Gregory Awards. Both performers have been involved with multiple productions receiving recognition at previous ceremonies, Henderson receiving the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical in 2017.
 
“We are thrilled to have this dynamic team at the helm for our 11th annual awards ceremony. Alexandria and Jimmy are both incredible performers; their vision and talent will ensure a not-to-be-missed event,” said Ariel Bradler, Executive director of Theatre Puget Sound.
 
About the Hosts
ALEXANDRIA J. HENDERSON is a performing artist currently residing in south Puget Sound. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music – Vocal Performance. Like many actors, Alexandria would love to perform on Broadway, and until that day she will remain active in local and regional theatre. Alexandria has been seen most recently as Elle Woods in Legally Blonde with Showtunes Theatre Company; Ali in The 5th Avenue Theatre’s Mamma Mia!; and Lorrell Robinson in Dreamgirls at Village Theatre (for which she won the 2017 Gregory Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Musical). Learn more at her website: www.alexandriajhenderson.com Or follow on Instagram! @missajhenderson
 
JIMMY SHIELDS is a performing and teaching artist from the Pierce County area. He has always known the arts was his calling and has never set his sights on anything else! Not just a lover of being on the stage, Jimmy is also an established choreographer and budding director. Recent theater credits include HAIRSPRAY with Village Theatre (Gilbert/Co-Choreographer), Legally Blonde with Showtunes Theatre Company (Choreographer), Matilda with Village Theatre (Ensemble/Associate Choreographer) and the West-coast premiere of Polkadots: the Cool Kids Musical with Tacoma Musical Playhouse (Director/Choreographer). Jimmy has BIG plans for the performing arts world and can’t wait to take you all along for the ride! 
 
About the Gregory Awards
Theatre Puget Sound’s 11th Annual Gregory Awards will be presented on Monday, October 28th (7:30pm) at Marion Oliver McCaw Hall in Seattle, WA. The Gregory Awards, which honors theatre artists in the Seattle area for distinguished theatrical achievements, and are recognized as the most significant theatre awards in the Northwestern United States.
 
The official eligibility cut-off date will be Wednesday, July 31, 2019 for all Seattle-area productions opening in the 2018-2019 season. Productions which meet all other eligibility requirements and open on or before the eligibility date are considered eligible for 2019 Gregory Award nominations.
 
The Nominations for the 2019 Gregory Awards will be announced August 2019.
 
Tickets for the ceremony will go on sale in August.
For more information on the Gregory Awards, visit GregoryAwards.org and Facebook.com/GregoryAwards and follow @GregoryAwards on Twitter.
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Board Spotlight: Laurie Lynch

In this month’s Spotlight, we get to know Board Member Laurie Lynch!

1. Tell us about yourself! Who are you?

My name is Laurie Lynch, They/Them/She/Her.  I am a theatre artist, dandy, educator, activist, mommy.  I work at the Rainbow Center in Tacoma Washington as the Education Coordinator, basically I am the person who is gay for pay, going out in the world and doing trainings for folks who need some education on LGBTQ competency and Gender Identity.  I am currently serving as the VP of the TPS board and am super excited about the work being done there.  I have been on the board for a year and change, I think, hahaha…time is a construct, who can say!

 

2. What’s your relationship to theatre?

I have been a theatre maker my entire life.  I studied theatre at Cal state university, Los Angeles, before getting my MFA in Contemporary Performance from Naropa University.  I became a college professor at the Community College of Denver after that teaching acting for 8 years and getting involved in the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival where I was the E.D.I. chair for our Region.  I feel strongly that making theatre is a privilege and a responsibility.  My partner got a job out here so we moved here, I became a stay at home parent and had to dive into a new theatre community.  I have performed with Sound Theatre Company and was a 2018 Emerging Artist at Intiman.  I have since been developing my solo show, “Dandyland:  Queering motherhood one day at a time.”  I am hoping to have it finished this fall!

 

3. What are some things you’re looking forward to as a board member this year?

I am so stoked for the FUNdraiser on June 17th!  It’s going to be a blast!  and I am even more excited to meet with the MAC, as that will be a primary role for the VP of TPS Board!  

 

4. If you were a play or musical, what would you be?

I would be the Newsies but cast with all queers!  Im a lil scrappy, a lil bit of a seeker, a lil bit of a leader, a lil bit of a cowboy, I love a good choreographed dance, and queers in those costumes is kind of a dreamy!  

 

5. What’s your favorite thing to do in Seattle in the summer?

I love working on my garden…Gay Gardens 2.0.  My 4 year old picked out flowers last year in all the rainbow colors cause well thats what they do and I love maintaining those gardens.  It’s a nice calm, especially this year as I will be putting on Tacoma Pride…COME on DOWN and say HI!  July 13th!

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“How to Read Music” Class with Anne Allgood

Materials Fee Waived for TPS Members!

Are you a confident actor or dancer, but the thought of learning music for a singing audition makes you cringe?  Are you a stage manager who has to call cues with a music score? Here, back by popular demand, is an opportunity to add an essential skill to your toolbox – The written language of music.

4 sessions in June; 2 hours each.

+++++++++++++++++++++++

GROUP A — DEMYSTIFYING 
(“WTF are all these dots and squiggles? HELP!”)

Monday June 3, 10, 17, 24
6:00 – 8:00 PM

+++++++++++++++++++++++

GROUP B – REMEMBERING AND BUILDING 
(“I played clarinet/sang in a choir/took piano lessons for a couple of years in elementary school; I think I remember things like ‘Every Good Boy Does Fine’ but have no idea what they mean anymore….”)

Tuesday June 4, 11, 18, 25
2:00 – 4:00 PM

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Tuition: $200 plus $20 materials fee
Materials fee is WAIVED for TPS members

Location: Anne Allgood’s private studio in Shoreline

Space is extremely limited —
Minimum class size: 4
Maximum: 10

The class will be fast-paced and FUN! There may be some sight-singing IF people want it; however, no one will be under any pressure to sing.  

And there will be treats.

CONTACT: Anne Allgood — AnneTeacher@comcast.net


ABOUT ANNE

IMAGE: “Pirates of Penzance” at 5th Avenue Theater, 2013

On Broadway, Anne appeared in The Most Happy Fella, Carousel, The Sound of Music, Beauty and the Beast, and Imaginary Friends. She has toured the U.S. and Europe in Parade, Evita, Floyd Collins, South Pacific, and Urinetown; and has appeared at regional theatres coast to coast. In Seattle, Anne has appeared in over a dozen starring roles at The 5th Avenue Theatre (among them The Old Woman in Candide, Mother Abbess in The Sound of Music, and numerous others), as well as at ACT Theatre where she is a Core Company Member (over a dozen roles, notably the title roles in Mary Stuart and Miss Witherspoon); Seattle Rep (Bad Dates; You Can’t Take it With You; The Constant Wife; Boeing, Boeing; and Luna Gale), Intiman Theatre (Cymbeline, Angels in America, and Wedding Band), Village Theatre, Seattle Children’s Theatre, and others.
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Staff Spotlight: Farewell, Keiko!

Keiko Green (that’s me!) leaves our offices at the end of this month, so Executive Director Ariel Bradler posed a few questions about her time in Seattle. Keiko worked in Communications at TPS and was also an active part of the Seattle theatre community, mostly as a performer, writer, and teaching artist. Now for the requisite NOSTALGIA POST.

1. Where are you going and what are you doing?

I’m moving down to San Diego to start my first year in the MFA Playwriting program at UCSD (University of California San Diego) in September. It’s definitely bittersweet, since Seattle has meant so much to me the past 7 years both personally and professionally, but I’m so excited for this next adventure. Most importantly, I’m looking forward to having tons of time to write lots and lots of plays and screenplays.

REAL TALK: I have one last really awesome project here in September, so you haven’t seen the last of me! Bwahahahah *moustache twirl*

2. What is the thing you’ll miss most about Seattle?

Moments like:
After performing for Wooden O at Luther Burbank, rushing to take down the set before it gets too dark, and sharing an adequately cold beer from the cooler with some dirt and sweat-stained theatre folk. 
Also the trees. And salmon.

3. What’s your advice to other members of the theatre community?

Be truthful but kind. Oh my goodness, that sounds so woo-woo. But really: assume good intentions from others until you have reason to no longer do so. So many before us have done amazing work and struggled deeply to make the world we live in today just a little bit more equitable. That work isn’t done and protect yourself, but it’s okay to lead from a place softness and fluidity — and not rush to a solid state of anger. It’ll just give you hemorrhoids or something. Protect thyself from hemorrhoids.
But being truthful also means… no lying or exaggerating in your resume/bio… I see you  😉  Honestly, be proud of the work you’ve done and realize that every person you look up to probably had to hustle a bit. It’s okay that you don’t have the credits you want yet. Now, GO GET THEM!

4. What is the funniest moment you’ve had on stage?

This is going to be really cheesy, I’m just letting you know this right know. It also taught me a lesson as a performer, that I’ve talked a lot about, so I’m going to share it again here.
During ACT’s Stupid F#$%ing Bird (still my favorite show, hands-down), I met my now husband MJ Sieber (there we are in this pic. aww). There was this little bit in the script, about how his character Dev was trying to connect with Mash (moi), and he started talking about this line of ducks he saw on his walk. MJ did the most ridiculous “duck walk,” which I’m not sure was actually in the script, and he would do it FOREVER until I finally cracked a smile or sometimes loudly guffaw-ed. I said, “You’re making me break!” And he said, “So what? Mash can laugh.” CUE: REALIZATION. We talked about how maybe Dev does make Mash laugh, despite herself. And that’s okay. That’s truthful. It’s something I love watching onstage now. Not when an actor breaks, necessarily, but seeing a character find humor. I love seeing what a character’s REAL laugh looks and sounds like, more (or just as much) as how they deal with sorrow and tragedy.

Also in Seattle Shakespeare’s All’s Well That Ends Well, earlier this year, Bob Wright started whipping Artistic Director George Mount in a moment before the final monologue, and EVERYONE ON STAGE LAUGHED. It was amazing to be a part of a moment of such joy.

5. What excites you most about this next chapter?

Sunshine and tacos.
I’m excited to really give myself to writing, instead of finding a couple hours between shows. I’m excited to start over again in a new city with a full idea of who I am as an artist and a person. Thanks to everyone in this amazing community for that.

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2019 UGA Performer Feedback

You already saw what the auditors had to say.
Now here’s some feedback from our amazing TPS Member performers who auditioned at this year’s 2018 Unified General Auditions.
176 of 390 auditioning performers responded to this survey.


Have you been contacted by an industry professional that saw you at the Unified General Auditions?

28% – Not yet 
72% – Yes

(Performers have been contacted for Talent Representation, Theatre Production Audition/Callback Invitations, and Play Readings.)


Is your willingness to audition dependent on knowing which organizations are in attendance?

2% – No 
98% – Yes 


Would you recommend the Unified General Auditions to other actors?

5% – No
85.5% – Yes
9.5% – No response


Selected general comments, notes, suggestions:

As always, I’m grateful for the opportunity to participate. I think it would be great if local filmmakers/film casting directors were invited to attend as well.
Thank you for offering this opportunity to audition for auditors that I wouldn’t otherwise be able to get in front of.  A “pie in the sky” request would be to see any notes or thoughts from auditors about what they see.
Going to the orientation a few weeks beforehand really helped me take notes and prepare for what was coming up. Also being able to ask questions about the process, audition pieces, and timing was very helpful. My only wish is that those auditioning could receive individualized feedback about their audition but I also know there are too many people and not enough time between those auditioning to write a lot down…but one can dream!
I chose to be in the not-quiet room so that I could warm up my voice and body and make noise.  There were several of us doing the same–all good. But eventually two women were in the room who had an interminably long, loud personal conversation about their work and lives outside of this particular audition circumstance.  It was obnoxious and distracting.  On the one hand, of course, I suppose they are “allowed” to have conversation in the “loud” room–on the other hand, I felt as though it was an abuse of the warm-up space and tone deaf to the existing vibes in the room.  The lobby seems a more appropriate place for an extended personal conversation.  Is this something that could be officially frowned-upon?  Even in the “loud” room, a loud, long personal conversation was extremely distracting.  Thanks!
I did wish more of the auditors were present when auditions began at 10. It seemed like many were still trickling in or not yet present, so I felt the audition wasn’t as useful to me as it was last year because several of the auditors I was hoping to see weren’t present yet.
I couldn’t find the audition address on the TPS website, which may have been user error, but it made me anxious. Fortunately the confirmation email had all the info; but it would be nice to have had that when determining if I could make it to the audition, since transportation is tricky sometimes.
I really appreciate all that goes into producing the UGA’s each year.  My participation helps me feel a stronger connection to everyone in our community.  I always feel like I am a stronger performer because of my participation.  I am fortunate enough to be able to afford my yearly membership dues – I hope that there are no barriers for those who cannot.  Thank you.
It would be nice if the headshots were able to be done in color – I’d pay extra to have them printed in color for the book. 🙂
More than one orientation date would have been nice. 
This was a very stress-free (minus the pre-audition jitters) experience. Shane said the hope was to not feel like a “cog in the machine”. It really felt like we were all artists coming together. Thanks for all of the hard work.
I think that, if possible, actors who are in their senior year of a BFA Acting program should be able to schedule an audition slot ahead of time instead of being put on the wait list. It can be challenging to get four credits worth of professional acting work while attending a four-year conservatory program, but that doesn’t mean we’re not ready, trained, and eager as ever to audition for professional work!
I would have LOVED the chance to work with the accompanist before the audition. Even for just five or ten minutes.
Thank you so much for a very clear, fun, professional and positive experience! The volunteers were so kind and helpful. The “what to expect” emails were great and really eased my mind on audition day. Much appreciated!

Thank you to all our wonderful performers, volunteers, and auditors who made the Unified General Auditions a success. See you next year!

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